Paul Vanderbilt with thematic panels.

Paul Vanderbilt's Wisconsin Thematic Panels - Image Gallery Essay

Learn about the experimental style of one of the country's most respected scholars in the field of photography and archives.

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This image gallery depicts Madison, Wisconsin, as a hub of dynamic social, political and cultrual change from the 1960s through the mid-1970s.

An early view of how a large corporation marketed a valuable piece of technology provides insight into contemporary views of consumerism and industry.

Milwaukee's First Photojournalist

Read about the life and career of photojournalist John Robert Taylor, who captured the spirit of Milwaukee through photographs in the early 20th century.

The Photographs of Harold Hone

This article describes the careers of Harold Hone and Frank Utpatel in relation to the W.P.A.

Photographs from the Apostle Islands

Learn about the history of the Apostle Islands in the northnmost part of Wisconsin, a popular summer refuge for tourists and residents.

Images of Pawling & Harnischfeger Electric Cranes

Discover how Wisconsin-based company Pawling & Harnischfeger became one of the world's leading suppliers of manufacturing services.

The Natchez Poverty Report

View this gallery of photographs from an unpublished 1960s report on living conditions in the African-American neighborhoods of Natchez, Mississippi.

Discover the works of Austrian artist Franz Hölzlhuber, who documented Wisconsin scenery through watercolor.

1850-2009

Photographs of political campaign techniques of the past.

Explore photographs of farm life in 20th-century Wisconsin.
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About Our Image Galleries

Image galleries feature selections from visual materials in the Society's Archives. They reflect the wide range of subjects, photographers, and collections available for research. Each gallery is introduced by an essay to provide historical context and background.

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