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Historical Essay

Norwegian Trinket Box

Wisconsin Historical Museum Object – Feature Story

Trinket box brought to Wisconsin by Norwegian immigrants, c. 1870. (Museum object #1993.6.2)

Historical Essay

Synagogue Window

Wisconsin Historical Museum Object – Feature Story

Window from "The White Shul", a Sheboygan, Wisconsin synagogue, c. 1910. (Museum object #2006.108.1.1)

Historical Essay

20th-Century Immigration

Learn how economic and social conditions in Wisconsin and elsewhere brought new groups of immigrants to Wisconsin in the 20th century.

The first and only manifestation The Virgin Mary in the United States confirmed by Vatican officials happened near Green Bay.

Historical Essay

Farming and Rural Life

Discover how farming drew immigrants to Wisconsin in the 19th century, the state's role as a major wheat producer, and later diversification of crops.

Wisconsin Historical Museum Object – Feature Story

Early hand-carved table made by Levi Havemann, a German immigrant to Madison, c. 1860. (Museum object #1998.21.1)

Historical Essay

Schurz, Carl (1829-1906)

Wisconsin Civil War Soldier, U. S. Senator, German-Language Newpaper Editor

Read about Carl Schurz, the German immigrant and political reformer who helped elect President Lincoln, fought in the Civil War, served as a U.S. Senator.

Wisconsin Civil War Officer, Politician

Read about the Norwegian immigrant who became colonel to the predominately Norwegian 15th Wisconsin Infantry during the Civil War.

Historical Essay

19th-Century Immigration

Read how improving transportation and the opening of lands formerly held by Indian tribes brought immigrants from Europe and eastern states to Wisconsin.

Discover how Wisconsin became a state in 1848 after failing to adopt the 1846 constitution which restricted banking and granted rights to women and blacks.

Wisconsin Historical Museum Object – Feature Story

Decorated trunk brought to Wisconsin from Norway by immigrant Mette Kristina Larsdotter Mokrid, c. 1845. (Museum object #2000.77.1)

Read how German Americans opposed Americanization and Native Americans opposed assimilation through English instruction in their schools.
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