Collage of historic photos.

Historical Figures in Wisconsin

Learn about the lives of your favorite Wisconsin historical figures, from the famous to infamous, and their contributions to our state's history.

Search Within:

Search by keyword below to find information on historical figures in Wisconsin.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
.

Jesuit Missionary

Read about the Jesuit priest who established several missions in Wisconsin during the 17th century.

During the Progressive Era, this Milwaukeean helped Jewish immigrants assimilate into American society while maintaining their ethnic heritage.

Read about the Wisconsin governor's tragic death, which occurred while he was helping wounded Civil War soldiers after the Battle of Shiloh.

Last Socialist to Run a Major American City

Learn about Milwaukee's third and last Socialist mayor. Read about the many improvements made to the city of Milwaukee under his leadership.

Historical Essay

Wilder, Thornton, 1897-1975

Learn more about this Madisonian's contribution to the literary community. This article details his Pulitzer prize-winning plays and novels.

Influential Early Wisconsin Settlers

Historical Essay

Meir, Golda (1898-1978)

Israel's First Female Prime Minister

Learn about the life of Israel's first female prime minster, her role in the Zionist movement, and her early years living in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

A Wisconsin Educator

Read about the Wisconsinite who was one of the first women to attend the University of Wisconsin and became the president of Milwaukee-Downer College.

Read this informative article about the life of the Wisconsin born author, most famous for the children's book series Little House on the Prairie.

Historical Essay

Babcock, Stephen, 1843-1931

Read about the agricultural chemist at the University of Wisconsin whose extensive research led to advances in the dairy industry.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Have Questions?

If you have questions about historical research, please contact our Library Reference Services staff by phone at 608-264-6535 or by email.

.
.