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Dictionary of Wisconsin History

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Search Results for: the letter 'W', Term Type: 'Things'

Term: wheat cultivation

Definition:

Wheat was Wisconsin's first major agricultural crop. Most of the people who immigrated intended to become farmers, especially of wheat because of its low initial planting cost and relative high rate of return. The development of mechanical agricultural implements better suited to prairie conditions allowed wheat production to expand dramatically in the 1850s. Before, with draft animals in short supply and wooden plows that broke easily, farmers could only plant a small number of acres.  Wisconsin was producing the second highest wheat yield in the U.S. by 1860.  Over the next five years, Wisconsin farmers harvested over 100 million bushels, more than two-thirds of which were exported. Wheat production peaked statewide in 1870 but signs of its decline had already been evident as early as the 1850s in some areas of the state. Three factors led to its decline: soil depletion, unsteady prices, and the railroads. Railroad development made eastern markets more accessible at the same time that it opened up more fertile lands west of Wisconsin, in Minnesota and the Dakotas. Wheat acreage declined after the Civil War, most rapidly in the southern, central, and eastern counties where corn, hay, oats, and other feed crops were substituted.  The growth of wheat farming had also created the need for a milling industry which was located primarily in major shipping areas.  The state also developed an agricultural implement industry to meet the needs of wheat farmers and to improve production.

View pictures related to agriculture at Wisconsin Historical Images.


[Source: Wisconsin's Cultural Resource Study Units]

86 records found

W.C.T.U.
Wabashaw Prairie
Wade House
wall rock (mining)
walleye
Walworth County Ploughboys (Civil War)
Wanagan (logging)
War of 1812
Washington Island
Waterloo Rifles (Civil War)
waterspout (meteorology)
Watertown German Volunteers (Civil War)
Watertown Irish Company (Civil War)
Watertown Rifles (Civil War)
wattle (farming)
Wau [origin of place name]
Waukesha Minute Men (Civil War)
Waukesha Union Guard (Civil War)
Waupacca and Portage County Union Rifles (Civil Wa
Waupun Light Guard (Civil War)
Waupun Rifles (Civil War)
way car (railroads)
wear [weir] (farming)
Weas
weather deck (maritime)
wheat cultivation
wheel (maritime)
wheelsman (maritime)
whey (farming)
Whiffletree-neckyoke (logging)
Whig Party
Whiskey-jack (logging)
Whitaker Guards (Civil War)
Whitewater (Civil War)
Whitewater Co. No. 3 (Civil War)
Widow-maker (logging)
wild cats
wild rice
Wilderness, Battle of the
Williamstown Union Rifles (Civil War)
winch (maritime)
Wind-fall (logging)
windlass (farming)
windlass (maritime)
Wing-dam (logging)
Wing-ding (logging)
Wing-jam (logging)
Winnebago
Winnebago Rapids
Winnebago War (1827)
Wisconsin (oldest cities and towns)
Wisconsin (state)
Wisconsin (statistics)
Wisconsin (territory)
Wisconsin Blue Book
Wisconsin Chair Co.
Wisconsin Dairymen's Association
Wisconsin Dance Bands
Wisconsin Emigrant Agency
Wisconsin Equal Rights Law (1921)
Wisconsin Federation of Women's Clubs (WFWC)
Wisconsin Home for Women (Taycheedah Correctional
Wisconsin Idea
Wisconsin Light Guard (Civil War)
Wisconsin state fair
Wisconsin State Federation of Labor
Wisconsin State flag
Wisconsin State Prison (Waupun Correctional Instit
Wisconsin Union Riflemen (Civil War)
Wisconsin Veterans' Home (Waupaca)
Wisconsin Yagers (Civil War)
withers (farming)
Witness-tree (logging)
wobbly
woman suffrage movement
Woman's Christian Temperance Union
Wood Protectors (Civil War)
Woodland culture (archaeology)
works (Civil War)
World War One (1914-1918)
World War Two (1939-1945)
World's Columbian Exposition
worm gear (maritime)
WPA (in Wisconsin)
Wyandot
Wylie Guards (Civil War military unit)

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