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Term: Bull Run, First Battle of

Definition:

Date(s): July 21, 1861
Location: Manassas, Virginia (Google Map)
Other name(s): Manassas I
Campaign: Manassas Campaign (July 1861)
Outcome: Confederate victory

Summary

The Battle of Bull Run was the first major engagement of the war. This embarassing Union defeat convinced many observers that the conflict would be longer and more brutal than they had anticipated.

After the war opened in April 1861, both sides recruited large armies to protect their capitals at Washington, D.C., and Richmond, Virginia. On July 16, 1861, the Union army began to march from Washington south toward Confederate forces. They encountered the Confederate enemy five days later at Bull Run, a creek near Manassas, Virginia.

On July 21, 1861, roughly 18,000 soldiers took the field for each side and fighting raged throughout the day. When Confederate reinforcements arrived, Union troops retreated in chaos back to Washington. It was at this battle that Confederate General Thomas J. Jackson earned the nickname “Stonewall.”

Bull Run's 3,461 casualties (1,969 Confederates were killed or wounded and 1,492 Union troops died) shocked observers. The next day President Lincoln called for 500,000 volunteers willing to serve for three years.

This battle should not be confused with the Second Battle of Bull Run fought in the same location on August 29-30, 1862.

Wisconsin’s Role

The 2nd Wisconsin Infantry was the only Wisconsin regiment engaged at Bull Run. It made several unsuccessful assaults on the enemy position, losing 19 men with 114 wounded. Thirty-eight Wisconsin soldiers were taken prisoner and confined at Richmond. They were released early in 1862.

Learn more

Read about Wisconsin's 2nd Wisconsin Infantry on pages 439-442 in E.B. Quiner’s “Military History of Wisconsin” (Madison: 1866).

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View original documents

[Source: Report on the Nation’s Civil War Battlefields (Washington, 1993); Estabrook, C. Records and Sketches of Military Organizations (Madison, 1914); Love, W. Wisconsin in the War of the Rebellion (Madison, 1866).]

154 records found

B.P. (time)
Babe (logging)
backstay (maritime)
Bad Ax Tigers (Civil War military unit)
Bad Axe (county)
Bad Axe, Battle of
Bad River Reservation
Badger Army Ammunition Plant
Badger Battery (Civil War military unit)
Badger Guards (Civil War military unit)
Badger State Flying Artillery (Civil War military
badger [origin of name]
Ball-hammer (logging)
ballast (maritime)
ballast (railroads)
balloon frame (architecture)
Banick (logging)
bank (railroads)
Bank Riot (1861)
bannerstone (archaeology)
Barber-chair (logging)
barge (maritime)
barker (logging)
Barn-boss (logging)
barque; also bark (maritime)
Barstow-Bashford Affair (1856)
basalt (mining)
bast (farming)
battalion
Battalion (Civil War)
batteau (Fr.)
batten (farming)
Battery (Civil War)
bay (farming)
Bay View Tragedy
Baye, la
bayonet (Civil War)
beam (maritime)
Bean-hole (logging)
Beaux Arts (architecture)
Beaver Dam Rifles (Civil War military unit)
Beef Slough War
beekeeping and honey production
beer in Wisconsin
beeves
Bell-ox (logging)
Belle City Rifles (Civil War military unit)
Belly-robber (logging)
Beloit & Madison Railroad Co.
Beloit City Guard (Civil War military unit)
Bennett Law
berdache (Fr.)
Berdan's Sharpshooters (Civil War military unit)
bere (farming)
Berlin Light Guard (Civil War military unit)
Berlin Light Guard (Civil War)
Berliner (food)
big (farming)
Big Boy (restaurant)
Big-wheels (logging)
bilge (maritime)
Bindle (logging)
bird's-eye view
Birl (logging)
bivouac (Civil War)
black gang (maritime)
Black Hawk War (1832)
black history in Wisconsin
Black River pinery
Black River Rangers (Civil War military unit)
Black River Tigers (Civil War military unit)
Black soldiers in the Civil War
Black Thursday (November 21, 1968)
Black Thursday (October 24, 1929)
Black Yagers (Civil War military unit)
Blind-punk (logging)
Blizzard of 1881
block (maritime)
Blowhard (Civil War)
board feet (logging)
board foot (maritime)
boarding schools
boatswain (maritime)
bobber (railroads)
bobstay (maritime)
Bohunk (logging)
Boiler (logging)
boiler (railroads)
Boiling-up (logging)
Bolt (logging)
Bond Law (temperance)
boom (logging)
boom (maritime)
Boomage (logging)
Boomer (logging)
Boot-jack (logging)
booya (food)
bosun (maritime)
bourgeois (Fr.)
bow (maritime)
bowsprit (maritime)
boxcar (railroads)
brain drain
brakeman (railroads)
branch line (railroads)
bratwurst
Break out (logging)
breastworks (Civil War)
breeches buoy (maritime)
Brentwood, Battle of
brevet (Civil War)
breviary
brewing industry in Wisconsin
brick (architecture)
bridge (maritime)
Bridge War (Milwaukee)
bridges in Wisconsin
brigade
Brigadier General (Civil War)
brigantine
brindle (farming)
broad gauge (railroads)
Broad-ax (logging)
Brown v. Board of Education (1954)
Browning Ruling (1896)
Brush a road (logging)
Brush-snow-fence (logging)
Bubble-cuffer (logging)
bubbler
Bucking-board (logging)
Buena Vista Artillery (Civil War military unit)
buff
bulkhead (maritime)
Bull (logging)
Bull Run, First Battle of
Bull Run, Second Battle of
Bull-cook (logging)
Bull-of-the woods (logging)
Bull-skinner (logging)
bulwark (maritime)
Bunching (logging)
bungalow (architecture)
Bunk (logging)
bunker (maritime)
Bunko (logging)
Burlington Rifles (Civil War military unit)
Burton Guards (Civil War military unit)
Bush a road (logging)
bushel (maritime)
bustard
Butt (logging)
butte (Fr.)
butternut (Civil War)
By-the-piece (logging)

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