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Term: Bull Run, Second Battle of

Definition:

Date(s): August 28-30, 1862
Location: Manassas, Virginia (Google Map)
Other name(s): Manassas II, Manassas Plains, Groveton, Gainesville, Brawner's Farm
Campaign: Northern Virginia Campaign (August 1862)
Outcome: Confederate victory

Summary

The Second Battle of Bull Run drove the Union army back to Washington, D.C. and opened the North to Confederate invasions during summer and fall of 1862.

On August 28, 1862, 62,000 Union forces attacked 20,000 Confederates between Gainesville and Manassas, Virginia. Though outnumbered, Confederate troops managed to hold off their attackers until 28,000 reinforcements arrived. On the August 29, their combined forces conducted the largest mass assault of the war, crushing the Union troops and pushing them back to Washington, D.C. By the end of the third day, more than 18,000 soldiers had been killed or wounded.

Wisconsin’s Role

The 2nd, 3rd, 5th, 6th, 7th Wisconsin Infantry regiments participated in the Second Battle of Bull Run. At Brawner’s Farm on August 28, 298 of the roughly 500 soldiers in the 2nd Wisconsin Infantry were killed or wounded. On August 29-30, the regiments were assigned to the rear to protect the retreating Union Army as it made its way back to Washington. Over the course of the three days, at total of 588 Wisconsin men were either killed or wounded.

When the Wisconsin regiments arrived in Washington, they rested at the fringes of the White House lawn. According to historian Frank Klement, “President Lincoln came out with a pail of water in one hand and a dipper in the other. He moved among the men, offering water to the tired and thirsty. Some Wisconsin soldiers drank from the common dipper and thanked the President for his kindness.”

Learn more

Read about Wisconsin's participation on pages 448-450 in E.B. Quiner’s “Military History of Wisconsin” (Madison: 1866).

View battle maps

View original documents

[Source: Report on the Nation’s Civil War Battlefields (Washington, 1993); Estabrook, C. Records and Sketches of Military Organizations (Madison, 1914); Love, W. Wisconsin in the War of the Rebellion (Madison, 1866).]

154 records found

B.P. (time)
Babe (logging)
backstay (maritime)
Bad Ax Tigers (Civil War military unit)
Bad Axe (county)
Bad Axe, Battle of
Bad River Reservation
Badger Army Ammunition Plant
Badger Battery (Civil War military unit)
Badger Guards (Civil War military unit)
Badger State Flying Artillery (Civil War military
badger [origin of name]
Ball-hammer (logging)
ballast (maritime)
ballast (railroads)
balloon frame (architecture)
Banick (logging)
bank (railroads)
Bank Riot (1861)
bannerstone (archaeology)
Barber-chair (logging)
barge (maritime)
barker (logging)
Barn-boss (logging)
barque; also bark (maritime)
Barstow-Bashford Affair (1856)
basalt (mining)
bast (farming)
battalion
Battalion (Civil War)
batteau (Fr.)
batten (farming)
Battery (Civil War)
bay (farming)
Bay View Tragedy
Baye, la
bayonet (Civil War)
beam (maritime)
Bean-hole (logging)
Beaux Arts (architecture)
Beaver Dam Rifles (Civil War military unit)
Beef Slough War
beekeeping and honey production
beer in Wisconsin
beeves
Bell-ox (logging)
Belle City Rifles (Civil War military unit)
Belly-robber (logging)
Beloit & Madison Railroad Co.
Beloit City Guard (Civil War military unit)
Bennett Law
berdache (Fr.)
Berdan's Sharpshooters (Civil War military unit)
bere (farming)
Berlin Light Guard (Civil War military unit)
Berlin Light Guard (Civil War)
Berliner (food)
big (farming)
Big Boy (restaurant)
Big-wheels (logging)
bilge (maritime)
Bindle (logging)
bird's-eye view
Birl (logging)
bivouac (Civil War)
black gang (maritime)
Black Hawk War (1832)
black history in Wisconsin
Black River pinery
Black River Rangers (Civil War military unit)
Black River Tigers (Civil War military unit)
Black soldiers in the Civil War
Black Thursday (November 21, 1968)
Black Thursday (October 24, 1929)
Black Yagers (Civil War military unit)
Blind-punk (logging)
Blizzard of 1881
block (maritime)
Blowhard (Civil War)
board feet (logging)
board foot (maritime)
boarding schools
boatswain (maritime)
bobber (railroads)
bobstay (maritime)
Bohunk (logging)
Boiler (logging)
boiler (railroads)
Boiling-up (logging)
Bolt (logging)
Bond Law (temperance)
boom (logging)
boom (maritime)
Boomage (logging)
Boomer (logging)
Boot-jack (logging)
booya (food)
bosun (maritime)
bourgeois (Fr.)
bow (maritime)
bowsprit (maritime)
boxcar (railroads)
brain drain
brakeman (railroads)
branch line (railroads)
bratwurst
Break out (logging)
breastworks (Civil War)
breeches buoy (maritime)
Brentwood, Battle of
brevet (Civil War)
breviary
brewing industry in Wisconsin
brick (architecture)
bridge (maritime)
Bridge War (Milwaukee)
bridges in Wisconsin
brigade
Brigadier General (Civil War)
brigantine
brindle (farming)
broad gauge (railroads)
Broad-ax (logging)
Brown v. Board of Education (1954)
Browning Ruling (1896)
Brush a road (logging)
Brush-snow-fence (logging)
Bubble-cuffer (logging)
bubbler
Bucking-board (logging)
Buena Vista Artillery (Civil War military unit)
buff
bulkhead (maritime)
Bull (logging)
Bull Run, First Battle of
Bull Run, Second Battle of
Bull-cook (logging)
Bull-of-the woods (logging)
Bull-skinner (logging)
bulwark (maritime)
Bunching (logging)
bungalow (architecture)
Bunk (logging)
bunker (maritime)
Bunko (logging)
Burlington Rifles (Civil War military unit)
Burton Guards (Civil War military unit)
Bush a road (logging)
bushel (maritime)
bustard
Butt (logging)
butte (Fr.)
butternut (Civil War)
By-the-piece (logging)

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