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Dictionary of Wisconsin History

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Search Results for: the letter 'B', Term Type: 'Things'

Term: brick (architecture)

Definition:

a construction method that employed rectangular blocks made from pressed and hardened clay. Brick making was intially done by small-scale, locally-based operations with bricks handcrafted; scores of brickyards scattered throughout the state each provided slightly different hues of brick throughout the 19th century. The lake clays along Lake Michigan produced light cream and buff-colored brick when properly made, while clays found elsewhere in the state produced various shades of red and brown brick. Outstanding among the early brick was that of Hustisford in Dodge County and Mineral Point in Iowa County because of good quality and exceptionally pleasant color in a blend of vermilion and burnt orange. A more uniform red color was produced in brickyards of the Duck Creek area near Green Bay, in Forestville, Door County and Menomonie in Dunn County. Milwaukee's first cream brick structure was erected in 1836; by 1853, six million bricks were being produced in Milwaukee kilns annually. The brickyard of George Burnham and Son became the city's largest producer of cream colored brick, manufacturing fifteen million bricks in 1880. The highest quality bricks were classified as "pressed;" these were smooth, very uniform in size and color, and extremely durable; "common" brick was usually sold ungraded and displayed inconsistencies in size and color. By the late nineteenth century, competition from Chicago firms and a shift in taste in favor of dark masonry led to the demise of Milwaukee's cream-colored brick industry. Another distinctive display of brick craftsmanship is found in the Belgian enclaves of Brown, Door, and Kewaunee counties. Farmhouses in the area were veneered with locally produced red brick, while cream brick was imported to accent window and door openings. The resulting polychromy is a distinctive feature of this rural landscape.  View more information elsewhere at wisconsinhistory.org

View pictures relating to architecture at Wisconsin Historical Images.

[Source: Cultural Resource Management in Wisconsin (Madison: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1986).]

154 records found

B.P. (time)
Babe (logging)
backstay (maritime)
Bad Ax Tigers (Civil War military unit)
Bad Axe (county)
Bad Axe, Battle of
Bad River Reservation
Badger Army Ammunition Plant
Badger Battery (Civil War military unit)
Badger Guards (Civil War military unit)
Badger State Flying Artillery (Civil War military
badger [origin of name]
Ball-hammer (logging)
ballast (maritime)
ballast (railroads)
balloon frame (architecture)
Banick (logging)
bank (railroads)
Bank Riot (1861)
bannerstone (archaeology)
Barber-chair (logging)
barge (maritime)
barker (logging)
Barn-boss (logging)
barque; also bark (maritime)
Barstow-Bashford Affair (1856)
basalt (mining)
bast (farming)
battalion
Battalion (Civil War)
batteau (Fr.)
batten (farming)
Battery (Civil War)
bay (farming)
Bay View Tragedy
Baye, la
bayonet (Civil War)
beam (maritime)
Bean-hole (logging)
Beaux Arts (architecture)
Beaver Dam Rifles (Civil War military unit)
Beef Slough War
beekeeping and honey production
beer in Wisconsin
beeves
Bell-ox (logging)
Belle City Rifles (Civil War military unit)
Belly-robber (logging)
Beloit & Madison Railroad Co.
Beloit City Guard (Civil War military unit)
Bennett Law
berdache (Fr.)
Berdan's Sharpshooters (Civil War military unit)
bere (farming)
Berlin Light Guard (Civil War military unit)
Berlin Light Guard (Civil War)
Berliner (food)
big (farming)
Big Boy (restaurant)
Big-wheels (logging)
bilge (maritime)
Bindle (logging)
bird's-eye view
Birl (logging)
bivouac (Civil War)
black gang (maritime)
Black Hawk War (1832)
black history in Wisconsin
Black River pinery
Black River Rangers (Civil War military unit)
Black River Tigers (Civil War military unit)
Black soldiers in the Civil War
Black Thursday (November 21, 1968)
Black Thursday (October 24, 1929)
Black Yagers (Civil War military unit)
Blind-punk (logging)
Blizzard of 1881
block (maritime)
Blowhard (Civil War)
board feet (logging)
board foot (maritime)
boarding schools
boatswain (maritime)
bobber (railroads)
bobstay (maritime)
Bohunk (logging)
Boiler (logging)
boiler (railroads)
Boiling-up (logging)
Bolt (logging)
Bond Law (temperance)
boom (logging)
boom (maritime)
Boomage (logging)
Boomer (logging)
Boot-jack (logging)
booya (food)
bosun (maritime)
bourgeois (Fr.)
bow (maritime)
bowsprit (maritime)
boxcar (railroads)
brain drain
brakeman (railroads)
branch line (railroads)
bratwurst
Break out (logging)
breastworks (Civil War)
breeches buoy (maritime)
Brentwood, Battle of
brevet (Civil War)
breviary
brewing industry in Wisconsin
brick (architecture)
bridge (maritime)
Bridge War (Milwaukee)
bridges in Wisconsin
brigade
Brigadier General (Civil War)
brigantine
brindle (farming)
broad gauge (railroads)
Broad-ax (logging)
Brown v. Board of Education (1954)
Browning Ruling (1896)
Brush a road (logging)
Brush-snow-fence (logging)
Bubble-cuffer (logging)
bubbler
Bucking-board (logging)
Buena Vista Artillery (Civil War military unit)
buff
bulkhead (maritime)
Bull (logging)
Bull Run, First Battle of
Bull Run, Second Battle of
Bull-cook (logging)
Bull-of-the woods (logging)
Bull-skinner (logging)
bulwark (maritime)
Bunching (logging)
bungalow (architecture)
Bunk (logging)
bunker (maritime)
Bunko (logging)
Burlington Rifles (Civil War military unit)
Burton Guards (Civil War military unit)
Bush a road (logging)
bushel (maritime)
bustard
Butt (logging)
butte (Fr.)
butternut (Civil War)
By-the-piece (logging)

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