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Wisconsin National Register of Historic Places

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Tigerton Village Hall and Engine House (P. Lacey photo, 2007)

Tigerton Village Hall and Engine House (P. Lacey photo, 2007)

Tigerton Village Hall and Engine House (P. Lacey photo, 2007)

Tigerton Village Hall and Engine House (P. Lacey photo, 2007)

Tigerton Village Hall and Engine House
215 Cedar Street, Tigerton, Shawano County
Architect: Charles Miller
Date of construction: 1905

In 1879, when the Milwaukee Lakeshore & Western Railroad reached the future site of Tigerton, lumberman had already dammed the South Branch of the Embarrass River and were floating logs to the sawmills of Oshkosh and New London. Frederick Rhinelander, the owner of the railroad, filed the original plat for the Village of Tigerton.

The village prospered and grew, in most part due to the lumber industry. When Herman R. Swanke arrived in Tigerton in 1885, he built a lumber mill. Over the next 38 years, Swanke constructed several mills in Tigerton. These mills provided employment and prosperity for the village.

With growth came the need for a permanent municipal building. In 1904, the decision was made to build a village hall and engine house. Fires had already destroyed area lumber mills and village businesses. Herman Swanke was instrumental in loaning the village the capital for this investment, providing labor and materials, and orchestrating the location of the village hall in close proximity to his sawmill. Horses that were used on a daily basis to move Tigerton Lumber Company logs and lumber were placed into active duty hauling village fire apparatus in times of emergency.

The two story village hall and engine house is topped by a rooftop bell tower; its large fire bell was used to call the volunteer firemen. The building housed the village clerk, the town board, and the volunteer fire department. It also included two cells for the police department. For many years the village library was located on the second floor. Dances and other social events were also held in the large second floor meeting space.

In 2007, Tigerton Main Street restored the building. It continues to be used for community events. The building is open during regular business hours.

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