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Wisconsin National Register of Historic Places

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2234 Eaton Ridge (T. Heggland photo)

2370 Rowley Ave. (T. Heggland photo)

2214 Hollister Ave. (T. Heggland photo)

2250 Rugby Row (T. Heggland photo)

West Lawn Heights Historic District
Bounded on the south by Illinois Central Railroad tracks, the west by Forest Hill Cemetery and the north by Regent Street, Madison, Dane County
Dates of contributing buildings: 1906-1946

The 1890s was a period of rapid growth for the city of Madison. The downtown area was growing denser and older neighborhoods were beginning to deteriorate. Spurred by the introduction of streetcars, developers platted new suburban neighborhoods. University Heights and Wingra Park were among the first suburbs developed in Madison. In 1903, as city services and schools became available, West Lawn Heights was platted between the two.

Development was slow until 1913 when investors created a new hybrid company to act as both a real estate sales agency and a land development company. The result was the innovative Madison Realty Company (MRC), which both sold lots and built homes on them. The MRC promoted the physical and social attractiveness of the development by advertising beautiful views of Lake Mendota and the surrounding countryside. Limited city zoning powers led suburbs like West Lawn Heights in adopting deed restrictions to ban liquor sales and enforcing more stringent building rules and restrictions. The MRC's approach became an effective model for suburban land development in Madison.

West Lawn Heights illustrates the evolution of early 20th century residential design between WWI and WWII in Madison. The city's best architects, including Alvan E. Small, recognized by his Prairie School designs, supplied plans for many of the homes, creating a distinctive concentration of early 20th century progressive to late Period Revival homes.

The homes in this district are private residences. Please respect the rights of the owners.

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