Use the smaller-sized text Use the larger-sized text Use the very large text
2013 Local History and Historic Preservation Conference.

2013 Featured Speakers

Bill and Bobbie Malone

Bill and Bobbie Malone with instruments.
Bill and Bobbie Malone

Bill Malone, who plays guitar, is emeritus Professor of History from Tulane University. He is an historian of country music, including such books as "Country Music, USA" and "Music From the True Vine: the Life and Music of Mike Seeger." He also hosts a radio show, "Back to the Country," Wednesdays on WORT in Madison. Bobbie Malone, who plays mandolin, is retired from the Office of School Services, at the Wisconsin Historical Society. She is currently working on a biography of Lois Lenski, a popular children's writer of the 1930s and 1940s.

Presentations
Connecting Young Audiences to People and Places in History

Presented by Dr. Bobbie Malone and Beth Lemke, Museum Educator, Wisconsin Historical Museum

Fri, Oct 11
3:20 - 4:30 pm

Over the past dozen years, the Wisconsin Historical Society has published a variety of materials for upper elementary school classrooms to engage students with Wisconsin's past. In this session participants will discover how a partnership between publications and programs helps students learn history. Beth Lemke will share practical examples of how to use publications to create and redefine youth educational programs. Dr. Malone will introduce participants to three sets of Society educational publications:

  • the inquiry-based core textbook, "Wisconsin: Our State, Our Story"
  • the New Badger History series books that add depth
  • the Badger Biographies series that acquaint students with more intimate portraits of some of the celebrated and not-so-famous Wisconsinites

Country Music and American History

Fri, Oct 11
12:15 - 1:30 pm, Luncheon Keynote Address

Bill and Bobbie will present a series of songs, supported by spoken commentary, that comment on a variety of topics and trends in American history. The presentation will span the period from the 1920s up through the early 1950s, and will include songs that touch upon such topics as the assassination of President Garfield, the sinking of the Maine, the Scopes Monkey Trial, fundamentalist religion, the Great Depression, and World War II.


Maxine Fleckner Ducey

Head and shoulders portrait of Maxine Fleckner Ducey.
Maxine Fleckner Ducey

Maxine Fleckner Ducey has been the head archivist at the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research for over thirty years. She holds a bachelor's degree from New York University, and a master's degree in Communication Arts, emphasis on the History of Film and Photography, from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is thrilled to be able to use her education on a daily basis as she curates WCFTR's extensive collections of manuscripts, moving images, photographs and promotional graphics, documenting the history of American theatre, motion pictures, television and radio.

Presentations
From Boop to Bennett: An Evening of Wisconsin Film and Filmmakers

Fri, Oct 11
7:30 pm
McMillan Memorial Library: Free and open to the public

From a commercial production of Betty Boop drawn by Wisconsin Rapids' own Grim Natwick to a delightful amateur film from famed Wisconsin photographer H.H. Bennett's daughter, Miriam, the evening promises to be full of Wisconsin scenes, Wisconsin history and Wisconsin fun. After a Boop cartoon (or two) there will be historical scenes from urban and rural Wisconsin captured by the motion picture cameras of both commercial and amateur cinematographers alike. Our evening will end with the screening of Miriam Bennett's "A Study in Reds," which was placed on the Library of Congress's National Film Registry in 2009, over seventy-five years after it was made!


Moving Images: Monsters or Marvels?

Sat, Oct 12
9:15 - Noon
Workshop, Pre-Registration Required:
Limit 16

Although they have been called "an unrivaled resource for the study of the history and culture of the last century," collecting, preserving and providing access to moving images can be a daunting task. This workshop will focus on basic identification, appraisal, handling, and storage of motion picture film for people who have little or no experience with film.

Anthony Rubano

Portrait of Anthony Rubano speaking at a lecturn.
Anthony Rubano

Anthony Rubano is a Project Designer at the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency and has consulted across the country on historic preservation and downtown design issues. He has worked extensively with the Illinois Main Street Program, providing architectural services to communities throughout the state. His work, along with that of his colleagues, has garnered awards from the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the National Council of State Historic Preservation Officers, and the Illinois Council of the American Institute of Architects. He is a part-time faculty member at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Presentations
Modernism on Main

Sat, Oct 12
9:15 - 10:25 am

Post World War II prosperity brought many changes to America's Main Streets. Some were small — the installation of a single open-front storefront — while other changes were more sweeping, from a host of new buildings to the conversions of entire downtowns into pedestrian malls. Understanding how these resources fit into the larger contexts of Modern architecture and modern consumerism is critical to fostering an appreciation for them. Significant in their own right, these installations continue to tell important stories about their districts' evolution. This presentation explores how Main Street's architecture evolved in the mid-20th century and looks at examples from communities that have made it a priority to preserve and market their more recent history.


Through the Picture Window

Sat, Oct 12
10:50 am - Noon

Post World War II tract homes are the built expression of the mid-20th-century American ideal. Suburbia itself represented the American Dream, and home ownership was its biggest component. Because much of suburbia was pre-planned and speculatively built, developers had to discern the public's tastes and desires in order for their homes to sell. The transformation of housing into a commodity made it more susceptible to changing tastes and fashion. Today, we can discover the aspirations of the burgeoning, post-war middle class by examining the houses in which it chose to live.

Lee Somerville

Head and shoulders portrait of Lee Somerville.
Lee Somerville

Lee Somerville is a landscape historian, Master Gardener, and the author of "Vintage Wisconsin Gardens: A History of Home Gardening." Lee received her master's degree in landscape architecture from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. For many years she volunteered at Heritage Hill State Historical Park in Green Bay, where she helped develop garden and landscape plans and organized volunteers to maintain those gardens. Her interests include regional garden history, working with historic plants and gardens, and volunteering with the Door County Master Gardener Youth Program.

Presentations
Yesterday's Gardens for Today's Gardeners

Presented by Lee Somerville and Betty Adelman, Owner, Heritage Flower Farm

Friday, Oct 11
Workshop, Pre-Registration Required:
Limit 16

Whether you are an historic site volunteer, the owner of an old home, or simply love the scents and colors of old-fashioned shrubs, flowers, and herbs, the presenters will guide you through the favorite garden styles and beloved plants of nineteenth and early twentieth century Wisconsin gardeners. Learn the history of these plants and how you can best use them to beautify your own garden by creating a vintage theme.


A Stroll through Wisconsin's Vintage Gardens

Sat, Oct 12 12:15 - 1:30 pm, Luncheon Keynote Address

What could be more beautiful than a Wisconsin garden in bloom, especially when it incorporates the colorful, fragrant blossoms of bygone days? Landscape historian Lee Somerville will take us on a stroll through some of the public and private gardens around our state to glimpse the array of heirloom flowers, shrubs, and herbs that beautify even the smallest space. Whether you love formal carpet beds of annuals, winding herbaceous borders, or neat rows of vegetables, there's something for everyone in the vintage garden.

  • Questions about this page? Email us
  • Email this page to a friend
select text size Use the smaller-sized textUse the larger-sized textUse the very large text