Increase Lapham surveys Wisconsin's trees, 1858

The Forest Trees of Wisconsin


Considered by many to be the father of Wisconsin forest conservation, Increase Lapham advocated for the preservation of trees far in advance of anyone else. Lapham believed that forests were a source of great national wealth, providing benefits to people, animals, and the climate. In this piece, Lapham describes the many different kinds of trees that grow in Wisconsin, many of which he feared were in danger of being destroyed. Lapham's work led to the creation of a special forestry commission in 1867.


Related Topics: Early Native Peoples
The Physical Geography of Wisconsin
The Conservation Movement
Creator: Lapham, Increase Allen
Pub Data: Madison, Wis. : Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, 1858?. Transactions of the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, v. 4 (1854-1857), p. 195- 251. (QL214 L37 1849-1860)
Citation: Lapham, Increase Allen, 1811-1875. The forest trees of Wisconsin. (Madison, Wis. : Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, 1858?). Transactions of the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society, v. 4 (1854-1857), p. 195- 251; Online facsimile at:  http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=1018; Visited on: 10/25/2014
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