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Marion Dudley testifies on behalf of suffrage, 1880

Suffrage for woman : a plea in its behalf, addressed to the Senate Committee on State Affairs, in the assembly chamber of the State of Wisconsin, at Madison, March 2, 1880


In the late 1870s and early 1880s, women in Illinois, Minnesota, and Michigan began to be allowed to vote on temperance and school issues. These legislative enactments inspired stalwart remnants of the Wisconsin Woman Suffrage Association to attempt to revive support for suffrage in Wisconsin. On March 2, 1880, Marion V. Dudley of Milwaukee testified before a state Senate committee on behalf of a suffrage bill. The committee refused to grant suffrage by legislative action though, allowing only a referendum on an amended "partial suffrage" bill for married women. Dudley's speech was reprinted in pamphlet form and distributed statewide in hopes of reviving the moribund state suffrage association. The bill did not receive the required second approval and fell by the wayside.

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Related Topics: The Progressive Era
The Woman's Suffrage Movement
Creator: Dudley, Marion Vienna Churchill.
Pub Data: Madison : s.n., 1880? (David Atwood, State Journal). (Pamphlet 56-1654)
Citation: Dudley, Marion Vienna Churchill. "Suffrage for woman : a plea in its behalf, addressed to the Senate Committee on State Affairs, in the assembly chamber of the State of Wisconsin, at Madison, March 2, 1880." (Madison : s.n., 1880? [David Atwood, State Journal]). Online facsimile at:  http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=1052; Visited on: 4/16/2014
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