An anthropologist gives a comprehensive account of wild rice, 1634-1900

The Wild Rice Gatherers of the Upper Lakes


This century-old study remains the most thorough and comprehensive description of wild rice and its importance to Native American peoples. Working from 300 years of published sources and first-hand surveys from Indian informants, Jenks reports on the botany of the plant itself, the nature of the habitat where it grows, the Indian communities that use it, how it was maintained, harvested, cooked and eaten, and its influence on social conditions, Indian economies, and even on geographic names. Jenks quotes liberally from Indian informants as well as three centuries of travel narratives, and includes 16 photographs and maps.


Related Topics: Mining, Logging, and Agriculture
Wild Rice Harvesting
Creator: Jenks, Albert Ernest, 1869-1953.
Pub Data: Annual report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution; v. 19, pt. 2, pp. 1013-1137 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1900).
Citation: Jenks, Albert Ernest. The wild rice gatherers of the upper lakes: a study in American primitive economics. (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1900). (Annual report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution; v. 19, pt. 2, pp. 1013-1137). Online facsimile at Online facsimile at:  http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=1065; Visited on: 8/29/2014
Join Now.