The Menominee and Ho-Chunk negotiate with the New York Indians in 1821.

Treaty of Green Bay, 1821.


This treaty dated Aug. 18, 1821, is signed by the chiefs and by President James Monroe. Under its provisions and another the following year, the Menominee and Ho-chunk would have given the Mohican Indians from New York virtually the entire western shore of Lake Michigan. In the end, however, the two Wisconsin tribes argued that their principal leaders had not attended the treaty councils, and that they had only intended to share the land rather than cede title to it; so this treaty never became law. It would take another decade and several more negotiations for the issue be settled.



Related Topics: Early Native Peoples
Territory to Statehood
Treaty Councils, from Prairie du Chien to Madeline Island
Creator: Unknown
Pub Data: Original manuscript in the Wisconsin Historical Society Archives (File 1821 August 18 Oversize)
Citation: Treaty of Green Bay, 1821. Original manuscript in the Wisconsin Historical Society Archives (File 1821 August 18 Oversize); Online facsimile at:  http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=114; Visited on: 8/22/2014
Join Now.