A report on unemployment relief in Northern Wisconsin, 1933

Report by Commissioner Ralph M. Immell to the Conservation Commission of the 1932 Unemployment Relief Program Administered by the Conservation Commission in Accordance with Paragraph 3 of Amendment 3A to Substitute Amendment No. 1S to Bill 35A


During the Depression, massive unemployment had a profound social and emotional effect on American workers and their families. In 1932, Congress passed the Emergency Relief and Construction Act which provided states with federal aid to fund construction and conservation projects while putting unemployed people to work. The Depression hit northern Wisconsin particularly hard, a situation the state's Conservation Commission sought to remedy through the construction of facilities to protect against forest fires. The Commissioner of the Conservation Commission, Ralph Immell, prepared this report on the success of the program in 1933. The Commission also prepared a plan to help relocate citizens who lived in especially remote areas to lands that would potentially prove better-suited for farming.


Related Topics: Industrialization and Urbanization
Depression and Unemployment
Creator: Immell, Ralph M.
Pub Data: Wisconsin State Conservation Commission, 1933. (CNS. 1/6: 1933)
Citation: Immell, Ralph M. "Report by Commissioner Ralph M. Immell to the Conservation Commission of the 1932 Unemployment Relief Program Administered by the Conservation Commission in Accordance with Paragraph 3 of Amendment 3A to Substitute Amendment No. 1S to Bill 35A." (Wisconsin State Conservation Commission, 1933); online facsimile at http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=1228 Online facsimile at:  http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=1228; Visited on: 11/29/2014
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