A survey of Milwaukee's Indian population, 1962

The Milwaukee Indian: a cooperative study by the Governor's Commission on Human Rights and the School of Social Work, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee


In the 1940s and 1950s, the federal government moved to end its financial responsibility to tribes based on a tribe's satisfactory degree of acculturation to white ways and economic self-sufficiency. The termination plan was accompanied by an urban relocation program that encouraged Indians to leave their reservations for vocational training and more mainstream lives in urban areas. Many Wisconsin Indians came to Milwaukee. In 1961, the Governor's Commission on Human Rights initiated a survey of Milwaukee's Indian population to determine how Indians were faring in the city. 140 Indians from 100 families participated in the survey, providing information on education, military service, religion, employment, and family life. While the authors sought to remain impartial, some biased generalizations were made that reflect the social and cultural feelings of the 1960s.


Related Topics: Wisconsin's Response to 20th-century change
Indians in the 20th Century
Creator: Governor's Commission on Human Rights
Pub Data: Madison, Wis.: Governor's Commission on Human Rights State Capitol, 1962. (WI GO RI.I 5/7/1962)
Citation: Governor's Commission on Human Rights. "The Milwaukee Indian: a cooperative study by the Governor's Commission on Human Rights and the School of Social Work, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee." (Madison, Wis.: Governor's Commission on Human Rights State Capitol, 1962). Online facsimile at http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=1243 Online facsimile at:  http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=1243; Visited on: 11/23/2014
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