President Johnson gauges Wisconsin's support for his re-election in 1968

A Survey of the Political Climate in Wisconsin-March 1, 1968.


After the Civil War, the war in Vietnam was perhaps the most divisive event in American life, polarizing the country and transforming political, social, and strategic debates. Although elected in a landslide in 1964, President Lyndon Johnson seemed unable to devise a strategy for victory, withdrawl, or peace in Vietnam, while sharp racial tensions at home led to widespread urban race riots between 1965 and 1968. Johnson faced considerable opposition to his renomination in 1968. Anti-war candidate Eugene McCarthy's strong showing in the New Hampshire presidential primary revealed Johnson's dwindling support. In March of 1968, the Johnson campaign commissioned a survey of Wisconsin voters in order to determine voter attitudes toward Johnson and his policies. The results of the survey and conclusions were reported to the Johnson campaign on March 22nd. On March 31, 1968, Johnson announced that he would not run for re-election.


Related Topics: Wisconsin's Response to 20th-century change
Vietnam and Opposition at Home
Creator: Penetration Research, Inc.
Pub Data: Larry Berman Collection (Presidential Archives Research), The Vietnam Archive. Texas Tech University.
Citation: Penetration Research, Inc. "A Survey of the Political Climate in Wisconsin-March 1, 1968." (Larry Berman Collection (Presidential Archives Research), The Vietnam Archive. Texas Tech University); Online facsimile at:  http://star.vietnam.ttu.edu/cgi-bin/starfetch.exe?aNbY34J822hqIZk
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K3291AQFfEF1Om7mbTql8Z49crM/0241207019.pdf; Visited on: 9/1/2014
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