Early History of the Brothertown Indians

Samson Occom: the founding of Brothertown by Christian Indians: an interesting paper read before the Oneida County Historical Society last evening


The Brothertown (sometimes found as Brotherton) Indians are descendants of the Pequot and Mohican tribes of southern New England. They united in 1769 when seven Christian and English-speaking communities moved to land in upstate New York. In the early 19th century, as white settlers pushed west, they were forced to move again. With their Oneida and Stockbridge neighbors, they came to Wisconsin in the 1820s and 1830s, settling mainly along the eastern shore of Lake Winnebago in Calumet County. This article reviews the early history of the tribe, especially the career of Mohican leader Samson Occom (1723-1792), a principal organizer of their move to New York. 




Related Topics: Territory to Statehood
Immigration and Settlement
Treaty Councils, from Prairie du Chien to Madeline Island
The Creation of Wisconsin Territory
19th-Century Immigration
Creator: Love, William De Loss, 1819-1898
Pub Data: Utica, N.Y. Utica Morning Herald, Feb 14, 1894; reprinted by the Oneida Historical Society, 1894. WHS Pam 54-6499.
Citation: Love, William De Loss. "Samson Occom: the founding of Brothertown by Christian Indians..." (Utica, N.Y.: Utica Morning Herald, Feb 14, 1894; reprinted by the Oneida Historical Society); Online facsimile at:  http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=1583; Visited on: 12/19/2014
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