A missionary travels 1,500-miles among the Ojibwe and Sioux in 1838

Six articles by Alfred Brunson


Alfred Brunson (1793-1882) was the first Methodist missionary in Wisconsin. These 6 articles from the Christian Advocate and Journal report on his efforts to meet with the Ojibwe and Sioux after the 1837 Treaty of St. Peters. In 1838 he traveled 1,500 miles in the Upper Mississippi while the two nations were at war, and his reports provide many details about tribal conflict and missionary life. The first includes some reflections on his motives (p. 7), the second recounts the history of Methodist missions in the region (pp. 8-11), the fourth and fifth provide accounts of tribal conflict and include a conversation with Ojibwe chief Hole-in-the Day (p. 20), and the sixth describes his ascent of the St. Croix and meeting with Ojibwe Chief Buffalo (p. 22).


Related Topics: Explorers, Traders, and Settlers
Early U.S. Settlement
Creator: Brunson, Alfred, 1793-1882
Pub Data: Six articles from the Christian Advocate and Journal, 1838-1839, in a scrapbook at the Wisconsin Historical Society Library.
Citation: Brunson, Alfred. "Six articles from the Christian Advocate and Journal, 1838-1839, in a scrapbook at the Wisconsin Historical Society Library." Online facsimile at:  http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=708; Visited on: 11/21/2014
Join Now.