The War of 1812

Although the fledgling United States took legal possession of Wisconsin at the close of the Revolutionary War, hardly anyone seemed to care. The new government had more important priorities than the remote Wisconsin frontier. And the few white residents here spoke little if any English, and looked not to Philadelphia and Boston for role models but to Montreal and Paris. The vast majority of Wisconsin residents were Native Americans, who needed good relations with both English and American fur companies to survive.

So when in 1812 politicians a thousand miles away began to complain about "freedom of the seas," few Wisconsin... more...

Original Documents and Other Primary Sources

Link to article: Indian Versions of Some Early Wisconsin EventsIndian Versions of Some Early Wisconsin Events
Link to article: A Ho-Chunk warrior cautiously acknowledges the U.S. in 1816.A Ho-Chunk warrior cautiously acknowledges the U.S. in 1816.
Link to article: A trader relates his family history and personal adventures, 1745-1857.A trader relates his family history and personal adventures, 1745-1857.
Link to article: Ho-Chunk chief Spoon Decorah looks back over a long life.Ho-Chunk chief Spoon Decorah looks back over a long life.
Link to article: Menominee chief Tomah declares his nation's neutrality.Menominee chief Tomah declares his nation's neutrality.
Link to book: A local historian chats about Prairie du Chien (vol. 2)A local historian chats about Prairie du Chien (vol. 2)
Link to book: A local historian chats about Prairie du Chien (vol. 1)A local historian chats about Prairie du Chien (vol. 1)
Link to images: Menominee Chief Oshkosh in 1858Menominee Chief Oshkosh in 1858
Link to images: Oil portrait of Souligny, Menominee war chief who fought with Tecumseh.Oil portrait of Souligny, Menominee war chief who fought with Tecumseh.
Link to manuscript: A British view of the capture of Prairie du Chien in 1814.A British view of the capture of Prairie du Chien in 1814.
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