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Curtiss with Langley's Aerodrome | Postcard | Wisconsin Historical Society

Postcard

Curtiss with Langley's Aerodrome

Curtiss with Langley's Aerodrome | Postcard | Wisconsin Historical Society
The Aerodome, invented by Samuel Langley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, as reconstructed by Glenn Curtiss at Hammondsport.
DESCRIPTION
The Aerodome, invented by Samuel Langley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, as reconstructed by Glenn Curtiss at Hammondsport.
RECORD DETAILS
Image ID:10193
Creation Date: June 1914
Creator Name:Unknown
City:Hammondsport
County:
State:New York
Collection Name:Kaminski, John G., 1893-1960 : Papers, 1912-1960
Genre:Postcard
Original Format Type:photographic print, b&w
Original Format Number:Milw Mss 146
Original Dimensions:5.5 x 3.5 inches
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
In addition to the bitter patent litigation with Glenn Curtiss, the Wrights also experienced patent problems with the Smithsonian Institution. With financial support from the federal government, Samuel Langley, secretary of the Smithsonian, had built a flying machine that he named the Aerodrome. In the public mind, if anyone had the qualifications to fly it was Langley. In 1903, shortly before the Wrights successfully flew at Kitty Hawk, Langley tested the Aerodrome. It crashed into the Potomac during the first trial. This experience is part of the reason that the U.S. government was wary of involvement with the Wrights' machine. It also made the Smithsonian jealous of the Wrights. In 1914, at the height of the Curtiss-Wright patent litigation, the Smithsonian asked Curtiss to rebuild and fly Langley's Aerodrome. If the Aerodrome as built in 1903 could have flown, it was reasoned, the Wright patent claims would be endangered. Curtiss did fly the Aerodrome in 1914, but only with major reconstruction. Orville Wright did not forget the experience, and in 1926 he sent the 1903 Wright Flyer for display in England. Not until shortly before Orville's death did the Smithsonian apologize, and the Flyer return to the United States.
SUBJECTS
Trees
Clothing and dress
Suits (Clothing)
Men
Outdoor photography
Inventions
Airplanes
Water
Boats and boating

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Reference Details
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