Underwater Archeologist at the Site of the <i>Louisiana</i> | Photograph | Wisconsin Historical Society

Photograph

Underwater Archeologist at the Site of the Louisiana

Underwater Archeologist at the Site of the <i>Louisiana</i> | Photograph | Wisconsin Historical Society
Underwater view of an underwater archeologist investigating the drift pins of the <i>Louisiana</i>. Algae and mussels are covering most of the wood of the ship.
DESCRIPTION
Underwater view of an underwater archeologist investigating the drift pins of the Louisiana. Algae and mussels are covering most of the wood of the ship.
RECORD DETAILS
Image ID:120000
Creation Date: June 10 2005
Creator Name:Thomsen, Tamara
City:
County:
State:Wisconsin
Collection Name:Maritime Preservation and Archeology Program Collection
Genre:Photograph
Original Format Type:digital file
Original Format Number:1509000024
Original Dimensions:2000 X 3008 pixels
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
The Louisiana is one of hundreds of wooden bulk carries built in the late nineteenth century based on the innovative design of R.J. Hackett, the forerunners of today's modern bulk carriers. Built in 1887, the Louisiana was part of the second generation of the Hackett design. The ship carried cargo, mostly coal and iron ore, along the Great Lakes until it was caught in the "Big Blow of 1913." Around midnight of November 8, on the way to Michigan to pick up a load of iron ore, the ship passed through a channel between the Bay of Green Bay and Lake Michigan known as Death's Door. A severe snowstorm greeted the Louisiana and her crew as they negotiated the rocky passage. The captain sought refuge from the dangerous conditions in Washington Harbor on Washington Island, but the Louisiana's anchors could not hold in the heavy seas and howling wind. The fierce storm drove the ship aground, perilously close to the rocky southeast shore of Washington Harbor. Rather than braving the heavy seas and surf in the tiny lifeboat, the crew elected to ride out the storm aboard the grounded steamer. By morning the storm was still raging and the ship was still helplessly caught on the rocks. The cargo hold caught on fire, a blaze the crew could not extinguish. The crew had little choice but to board the lifeboat and take their chances in the surf, leaving the Louisiana to suffer the ravages of the fire and the storm. The men rowed toward shore, struggling to keep the small lifeboat from capsizing or crashing against the rocks. With great luck, they made it through the powerful breakers and landed safely on shore. The wreck of the Louisiana is now laying scattered along the southeast side of Washington Harbor, including part of the bow which is sitting on the rocky beach 100 feet south of the main site. For more information on the Louisiana visit the Wisconsin Shipwrecks website.
SUBJECTS
Aquatic animals
Plants
Protective clothing
Archaeology
Underwater photography
Men
Women
Scuba diving
Underwater exploration
Cargo ships
Great Lakes
Marine accidents
Ships
Michigan, Lake

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Reference Details
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