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Wisconsin Historical Society

National or State Registers Record

1603 MAIN ST

National or State Register of Historic Places
1603 MAIN ST | National or State Registers Record | Wisconsin Historical Society
NAMES
Historic Name:Otto and Ida Loeffler House
Reference Number:100004206
PROPERTY LOCATION
Location (Address):1603 MAIN ST
County:La Crosse
City/Village:La Crosse
Township:
SUMMARY
Otto and Ida Loeffler House
1603 Main Street, La Crosse, La Crosse County
Date of Construction: 1909

The Otto and Ida (Smith) Loeffler House is located east of La Crosse’s traditional downtown. It is a two-story, frame residence veneered with cream brick, and was built in 1909. The house represents the Georgian Revival subtype of the Colonial Revival style.

The Loeffler House is an excellent example of Georgian Revival, reflecting the creative, pre-World War I interpretation of Federal and Georgian residences of the colonial era in the U.S. During the pre-World War I period, elements drawn from the earlier Queen Anne, or the contemporaneous Craftsman and Prairie styles, were often incorporated into the design. The Loeffler House displays distinguishing characteristics of Georgian Revival: the rectangular plan; the formal, symmetrical façade; dormers; and classical details such as the front entrance with flanking sidelights, denticulated cornices, and the pedimented portico that projects from the front porch. The two-story polygonal bay and the cottage windows are Queen Anne components, although the diamond-paned glass recalls the medieval-European-influenced windows of the colonial period. The Loeffler House also possesses wide eaves with exposed rafter tails, and a full-façade front porch, features drawn from the Craftsman and Prairie School. On the interior, the Loeffler House embodies the Georgian Revival with its central hall plan, and the simple, classical surrounds, baseboards, moldings, staircase elements, and fireplace mantelpiece.

Otto Loeffler (1853-1922) was born in Pomerania, and immigrated to Wisconsin with his parents in 1868. The family settled in Dodge County. In 1885, Otto followed his brother, Herman Loeffler, to La Crosse. The brothers ran a men’s clothing and tailoring business together until 1893. That year, Loeffler and John A. Elliott incorporated the Elliott-Loeffler Company. The business imported wines and liquors, selling them a 222 Pearl Street in downtown La Crosse. Loeffler would serve as president of the firm until his death. In 1902, Loeffler married his third wife, Ida Smith (1872-1950). She was born in La Crosse County, the daughter of German immigrants. The house at 1603 Main Street was built for the couple in 1909. Ida Loeffler lived in the house until she passed away. The Loeffler House is a private home and is not open to the public.

PROPERTY FEATURES
Period of Significance:1909
Area of Significance:Architecture
Applicable Criteria:Architecture/Engineering
Historic Use:Domestic: Single Dwelling
Architectural Style:Colonial Revival
Resource Type:Building
DESIGNATIONS
Historic Status:Listed in the State Register
Historic Status:Listed in the National Register
National Register Listing Date:07/22/2019
State Register Listing Date:05/17/2019
NUMBER OF RESOURCES WITHIN PROPERTY
Number of Contributing Buildings:1
Number of Contributing Sites:0
Number of Contributing Structures:0
Number of Contributing Objects:0
Number of Non-Contributing Sites:0
Number of Non-Contributing Structures:0
Number of Non-Contributing Objects:0
RECORD LOCATION
National Register and State Register of Historic Places, Division of Historic Preservation, Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin

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National Register of Historic Places Citation
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