Wisconsin Historical Society

Property Record

2090 N CHURCH ST

Architecture and History Inventory
2090 N CHURCH ST | Property Record | Wisconsin Historical Society
NAMES
Historic Name:Buena Vista House
Other Name:COACHES COBBLESTONE INN
Contributing:
Reference Number:10105
PROPERTY LOCATION
Location (Address):2090 N CHURCH ST
County:Walworth
City:East Troy
Township/Village:
Unincorporated Community:
Town:
Range:
Direction:
Section:
Quarter Section:
Quarter/Quarter Section:
PROPERTY FEATURES
Year Built:1846
Additions:
Survey Date:1978
Historic Use:house
Architectural Style:Greek Revival
Structural System:
Wall Material:Cobblestone
Architect:SAMUEL R. BRADLEY
Other Buildings On Site:0
Demolished?:No
Demolished Date:
DESIGNATIONS
National/State Register Listing Name: Buena Vista House
National Register Listing Date:1/18/1978 12:00:00 AM
State Register Listing Date:1/1/1989 12:00:00 AM
National Register Multiple Property Name:
NOTES
Additional Information:A 'site file' exists for this property. It contains additional information such as correspondence, newspaper clippings, or historical information. It is a public record and may be viewed in person at the State Historical Society, Division of Historic Preservation. LARGEST KNOWN COBBLESTONE BLDG IN WISCONSIN. STONE QUOINS.

In a state with an unusually large collection of cobblestone buildings, the Buena Vista House is the biggest and one of the finest. Its builder was Samuel Bradley, a young mason who ran a hotel in Milwaukee with his wife before moving to East Troy. In 1846, he built the stone walls of his new inn and began the laborious task of veneering them with cobblestones. Because it took so long to select the small stones and lay them in uniform courses, most masons working with this material veneered only the principal facade, leaving the structural walls of rubble or quarried stone exposed at the sides and rear. But Bradley veneered all four sides, using colorful egg-shaped stones he had gathered from nearby lakes and running tooled V-shaped mortar joints between each horizontal course. The process took three years.

Like most cobblestone buildings, this one is a vernacular interpretation of the Greek Revival style, with a broad cornice, granite and limestone quoins, and flat-arched limestone lintels. Originally, a one-story porch ran along the west (front) and wrapped around to the north side, but all that remains today are two smaller, pedimented porch roofs, supported by large brackets, on the front. The paired windows on the second floor, over the main entrance, show where a doorway once opened onto a covered balcony. The ground level has always housed a restaurant, but the interior has been altered repeatedly.
Bibliographic References:PERRIN 1962, P. 78. KOHLER, P. 7. COBBLESTONE BUILDINGS IN WISCONSIN, P. 14. EAST TROY NEWS 10/9/1996. Buildings of Wisconsin manuscript.
RECORD LOCATION
Wisconsin Architecture and History Inventory, Division of Historic Preservation, Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin

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