Wisconsin Historical Society

Property Record

NW CNR OF N GERMAN ST AND E BRIDGE ST

Architecture and History Inventory
NW CNR OF N GERMAN ST AND E BRIDGE ST | Property Record | Wisconsin Historical Society
NAMES
Historic Name:Hollenstein Wagon and Carriage Factory
Other Name:Hollenstein Wagon and Carriage Factory Museum
Contributing:
Reference Number:15261
PROPERTY LOCATION
Location (Address):NW CNR OF N GERMAN ST AND E BRIDGE ST
County:Dodge
City:Mayville
Township/Village:
Unincorporated Community:
Town:
Range:
Direction:
Section:
Quarter Section:
Quarter/Quarter Section:
PROPERTY FEATURES
Year Built:1876
Additions: 1888
Survey Date:1975
Historic Use:industrial building
Architectural Style:Commercial Vernacular
Structural System:
Wall Material:Cream Brick
Architect:
Other Buildings On Site:
Demolished?:No
Demolished Date:
DESIGNATIONS
National/State Register Listing Name: Hollenstein Wagon and Carriage Factory
National Register Listing Date:7/27/1979 12:00:00 AM
State Register Listing Date:1/1/1989 12:00:00 AM
National Register Multiple Property Name:
NOTES
Additional Information:FLAT ROOF FACTORY PORTION W/GABLED HOLLENSTEIN HOUSE FACING BRIDGE ST. HOLLENSTEIN WAS A SWISS WAGON MAKER WHO SWITCHED TO WAGON MFG. FRAME HOUSE VENEERED IN BRICK TO MATCH FACTORY. OLDEST PORTION OF FACTORY JOINS HOUSE AT E. END. STILTED SEGMENTAL ARCH LINTELS.


This little factory is a microcosm of small-scale industrialization, illustrating America's nineteenth-century transition from cottage-based to factory-based production. Swiss immigrant John Hollenstein moved to Mayville in 1873 to start a wheelwrighting and wagonmaking business. Within three years, he erected either his house, the original portion of the factory, or both. Like many tradesmen who became factory owners, Hollenstein attached his place of business to his home, and he boarded several of his employees, perpetuating a traditional artisan-apprentice relationship and a pre-industrial connection between workshop and family life.
Within a decade, demand for Hollenstein’s wagons, sleighs, buggies, coaches, and omnibuses had grown enough to warrant a major expansion. He erected a 40-foot-by-66-foot addition in 1888; two years later, he added a two-story powerhouse with a ten-horsepower steam engine to the north side. He prospered until the 1910s, when mass production of automobiles and trucks rendered his business obsolete.

Each stage of growth is clearly visible on the building. At one end stands Hollenstein's two-story post-and-beam house, a vernacular, side-gabled structure. Originally clad in clapboard, the house acquired a cream-brick veneer to match the factory. Large segmentally arched windows light the house, and a full-width veranda with dentils and scroll brackets spans the facade. The factory’s oldest portion, adjoining the house on the east, is a two-story cream-brick structure with a flat roof and segmentally arched windows. Brick stringcourses mark the original roofline. When Hollenstein added the largest portion of the factory, again using cream brick, he raised the roof of the old building and visually tied the old and new structures together with a corbel table. On the north side of the complex are the last two additions, including the two-story powerhouse, which has lost its boiler, engine, and smokestack. The painted legend "Wagon & Carriage Factory" replicates the original sign. The Mayville Historical Society now operates the complex as an industrial museum.
Bibliographic References:Buildings of Wisconsin manuscript.
RECORD LOCATION
Wisconsin Architecture and History Inventory, Division of Historic Preservation, Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin

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