Wisconsin Historical Society

Property Record

SE CNR MILWAUKEE ST AND RANDOLPH ST

Architecture and History Inventory
SE CNR MILWAUKEE ST AND RANDOLPH ST | Property Record | Wisconsin Historical Society
NAMES
Historic Name:F G HAESE GENERAL MERCHANDISE STORE (A)
Other Name:
Contributing:
Reference Number:2838
PROPERTY LOCATION
Location (Address):SE CNR MILWAUKEE ST AND RANDOLPH ST
County:Calumet
City:
Township/Village:Brillion
Unincorporated Community:FOREST JUNCTION
Town:20
Range:20
Direction:E
Section:17
Quarter Section:NW
Quarter/Quarter Section:SW
PROPERTY FEATURES
Year Built:1884
Additions:
Survey Date:1979
Historic Use:retail building
Architectural Style:Boomtown
Structural System:
Wall Material:Clapboard
Architect:
Other Buildings On Site:
Demolished?:No
Demolished Date:
DESIGNATIONS
National/State Register Listing Name: Haese Memorial Village Historic District
National Register Listing Date:3/2/1982 12:00:00 AM
State Register Listing Date:1/1/1989 12:00:00 AM
National Register Multiple Property Name:
NOTES
Additional Information:SEE NRHP SKETCH MAP,BRACKETED ROUND ARCH FALSE FRONT LIVING QUARTERS ATTACHED TRANSOM WINDOW OVER DOUBLE DOOR HARDWARE, PLUMBING AND LIGHTING FIXTURES FROM 1914

Forest Junction began as a crossing of two railroads in the lowland forests of northeastern Calumet County. Indeed, the village's storefronts faced the tracks. Among them was the Haese General Merchandise Store, now a museum. Built in 1884 by a local carpenter for John Otto, the building grew over the years as its subsequent owner, F. G. Haese, responded to changing circumstances. Haese added lumber and other building materials to his line of merchandise in 1893, when the national economic depression forced many of his customers in northern-Wisconsin lumber camps to pay for their goods in lumber instead of cash. And when the Automobile Age dawned, he opened a filling station. But the automobile proved to be his undoing. As cars brought increased mobility, customers began shopping in Appleton and other larger cities. Today, the Haese store reminds us of the way things were.

The building is remarkably intact. Its two-story facade rises above the height of the front-gabled building to form an imposing but false front. On the ground floor, pilasters frame a typical nineteenth-century storefront: a pair of glazed and paneled double-doors with a two-light transom above, and on either side, three-over-three display windows over paneled kickplates. Above this storefront, a bracketed parapet wall with a semicircular pediment crowns the clapboard second-story. The small attic window below the parapet was added in 1914, but the rectangular sash windows are original. Inside the store, the original furnishings include light fixtures, a wood-stove, wooden counters, and built-in cabinets. Haese's living quarters were in the back.

The Haese General Merchandise Store is part of a complex of buildings, representing Haese's family life and his business interests. An annex with a shorter profile is attached to one side. Adjacent to the store is the frame shed that served as a filling station, along with a milkhouse and summer kitchen, a carriage house and granary, a smokehouse, and an outhouse. Across Randolf Street is Haeseā€™s barn, a hardware store and warehouse that he acquired in 1889, and a machine shed, built in 1914, where he displayed his farm implements.
Bibliographic References:[A] NRHP NOMINATION FORM. ROBERT HAESE, A HISTORY OF FOREST JUNCTION. Chilton Times-Journal July 5, 1979 Buildings of Wisconsin manuscript.
RECORD LOCATION
Wisconsin Architecture and History Inventory, Division of Historic Preservation, Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin

Have Questions?

If you didn't find the record you were looking for, or have other questions about historic preservation, please email us and we can help:

If you have an update, correction, or addition to a record, please include this in your message:

  • AHI number
  • Information to be added or changed
  • Source information

Note: When providing a historical fact, such as the story of a historic event or the name of an architect, be sure to list your sources. We will only create or update a property record if we can verify a submission is factual and accurate.

How to Cite

For the purposes of a bibliography entry or footnote, follow this model:

Wisconsin Architecture and History Inventory Citation
Wisconsin Historical Society, Wisconsin Architecture and History Inventory, "Historic Name", "Town", "County", "State", "Reference Number".