Wisconsin Historical Society

Property Record

1012 W 3RD AVE

Architecture and History Inventory
1012 W 3RD AVE | Property Record | Wisconsin Historical Society
NAMES
Historic Name:L.C. BARTLETT AND SON, CARRIAGE AND WAGON FACTORY
Other Name:
Contributing: Yes
Reference Number:40851
PROPERTY LOCATION
Location (Address):1012 W 3RD AVE
County:Green
City:Brodhead
Township/Village:
Unincorporated Community:
Town:
Range:
Direction:
Section:
Quarter Section:
Quarter/Quarter Section:
PROPERTY FEATURES
Year Built:1881
Additions:
Survey Date:1980
Historic Use:industrial building
Architectural Style:Italianate
Structural System:
Wall Material:Brick
Architect:
Other Buildings On Site:0
Demolished?:No
Demolished Date:
DESIGNATIONS
National/State Register Listing Name: Exchange Square Historic District
National Register Listing Date:11/15/1984 12:00:00 AM
State Register Listing Date:1/1/1989 12:00:00 AM
National Register Multiple Property Name:
NOTES
Additional Information:A 'site file' exists for this property. It contains additional information such as correspondence, newspaper clippings, or historical information. It is a public record and may be viewed in person at the State Historical Society, Division of Historic Preservation.

A significant example of mid-19th century industrial architecture in Green County, the L.C. Bartlett Carriage and Wagon Factory, constructed in 1881-1883 after the earlier factory burned, is a simple two-story cream brick building with a long rectangular profile and a low-pitched gabled roof. the building exhibits the restrained detail appropriate to a utilitarian structure, but it is not without the suggestion of style: the simple massing is relieved by tall segmentally arched windows which punctuate the facade (six window bays across the side elevations; three across the front and rear) and which are crowned by heavy brick hoods, springing from corbelled imposts. The ornate window hoods, adorning a purely functional building, are indicative of the pervasiveness of the commercial Italianate style in the Exchange Square District. Currently, the property is being restored by its owner and the original wall signs have been repainted.

Established in 1869, (at the time of the Square and adjacent to the railroad tracks), L.C. Bartlett and Sons manufactured carriages, wagons, and cutters in addition to offering blacksmith and repair services. Of three buildings in the original complex, this brick structure served as the manufactory for the firm, and was later converted to a warehouse. In the 19th century, the Bartlett firm handled a variety of farm implements, including the Walter A. Wood reaper and mower, the Albion Spring Tooth cultivator, the Racine Seeder and John Deere plows. The key industrial structure in the Exchange Square district, the factory's location -- close to the railroad and the commercial center -- suggests the multi-functional nature of the district.
Bibliographic References:(A) Brodhead Independent Register 12/7/1994. (B) History of Green County. 1884, p. 813. (C) The City of Brodhead. 1893, T.S. Sherwood, p. 31.
RECORD LOCATION
Wisconsin Architecture and History Inventory, Division of Historic Preservation, Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin

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