Wisconsin Historical Society

Property Record

1609 CHURCH ST

Architecture and History Inventory
1609 CHURCH ST | Property Record | Wisconsin Historical Society
NAMES
Historic Name:Thomas B. Hart House
Other Name:Richard A. and Lynne R. Burling House
Contributing:
Reference Number:8906
PROPERTY LOCATION
Location (Address):1609 CHURCH ST
County:Milwaukee
City:Wauwatosa
Township/Village:
Unincorporated Community:
Town:
Range:
Direction:
Section:
Quarter Section:
Quarter/Quarter Section:
PROPERTY FEATURES
Year Built:1845
Additions:
Survey Date:1995
Historic Use:house
Architectural Style:High Victorian Gothic
Structural System:Balloon Frame
Wall Material:Clapboard
Architect:
Other Buildings On Site:
Demolished?:No
Demolished Date:
DESIGNATIONS
National/State Register Listing Name: Hart, Thomas B., House
National Register Listing Date:10/10/1985 12:00:00 AM
State Register Listing Date:1/1/1989 12:00:00 AM
National Register Multiple Property Name:
NOTES
Additional Information:A 'site file' exists for this property. It contains additional information such as correspondence, newspaper clippings, or historical information. It is a public record and may be viewed in person at the State Historical Society, Division of Historic Preservation.

POINTED ARCHED WINDOW IN DORMER. ELABORATE PIERCED BARGE BOARDS IN GABLES. PIERCED WORK ON PORCH.

One of Wauwatosa’s oldest houses, this two-story residence exemplifies the Gothic Revival subtype called Carpenter’s Gothic. Hallmark traits include the cross-gabled roof, the one-story porch with flattened-arch brackets, and the one-story bay window lighting the parlor. But what makes the Hart House memorable are its spectacular bargeboards, wooden confections jig-sawn to showcase the carpenter’s craft. There are six bargeboard patterns in all: an oak-leaf pattern in the large gable over the bay window, a quatrefoil-and-trefoil combination in the gabled porch entry, a lacy hand-carved pattern in the gable over the second-story lancet window, a floral motif in the front south-facing gable, and quatrefoils throughout. There is even a wavelike design in the bargeboards of the old barn.

The construction date is uncertain, but the house may have been the first residence built on Church, Wauwatosa’s first residential street. Thomas Hart, who bought the house in 1874, helped found the city by building a sawmill on the Menomonee River around 1838, followed by a gristmill in 1841. The Hart House, originally T-shaped, grew over the years with additions made to the rear, though its front and side facades have barely changed. The current owners restored the house in the 1980s and 1990s.
Bibliographic References:Buildings of Wisconsin manuscript.
RECORD LOCATION
Wisconsin Architecture and History Inventory, Division of Historic Preservation, Wisconsin Historical Society, Madison, Wisconsin

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