Wisconsin Historical Society

General Information

Local History Webinars

Fall/Winter Series 2017-2018

Local History Webinars from the Wisconsin Historical Society | Wisconsin Historical Society

Local History Webinars

All of the Local History-Field Services' Local History Webinars are on Wednesdays and start at 10:30 am and conclude by 12:00 pm CT. There will be time during each program to ask questions for those that attend the live broadcast. All webinars will be recorded and available for viewing afterwards. All Local History Webinars are free and available to those in and out of Wisconsin. (Check here to make sure your computer system will support this program.)

November 8, 2017 - Making History Relevant

Presented by John Dichtl, President/CEO of the American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) and who also serves on the executive committee of the History Relevance Campaign.

The History Relevance (HR) initiative is a group of history professionals posing questions about what makes the past relevant today. History can have more impact when it connects the people, events, places, stories and ideas of the past with people, events, places, stories and ideas that are important and meaningful to audiences today. This session will bring attendees up-to-date on HR’s activities and how the national campaign can be used as a tool at the local level. 

Listen to the recording by clicking here.

December 6, 2017 - Tips for Applying to the Conservation Assessment Program

Presented by Tiffani Emig, CAP Program Coordinator, Foundation of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (FAIC). Tiffini previously served as Curator of Collections for a small industrial history museum in Pennsylvania.

The Collections Assessment for Preservation (CAP) program connects small and mid-sized museums with collections care professionals who help identify and prioritize the museum's collections care needs. The CAP report can be useful in developing a long-term preservation plan and in leveraging funding to implement collections care projects.

Register for this program here.

January 10, 2018 - Wisconsin Historical Society Affiliation Program

Presented by Rick Bernstein, Local History-Field Services, Office of Programs and Outreach, Wisconsin Historical Society.

The Wisconsin Historical Society's Affiliation program began in 1898, an outgrowth of the 50th anniversary of Wisconsin's Statehood. 120 years later, the program includes nearly 400 affiliated organizations- that in turn encompass over 60,000 members and a total budget of nearly $12 million. Learn more about the history of the Wisconsin Historical Society's affiliation program and the benefits it offers, the singular significance of local history and how this program might offer something your local historical organization might need.

Register for this program here.

January 24, 2018 - Textiles 101

Presented by Karen DePauw, Coordinator, Local History Services, Indiana Historical Society. As coordinator of Local History Services at the Indiana Historical Society, Karen DePauw serves Indiana organizations through collection care trainings and workshops.  She received a bachelor of arts in history at Quincy University and a master of science from the University of Rhode Island focusing on historic costumes and textile conservation.  Karen's passion for historic costumes and textiles has lead to the publication of two books, The Care and Display of Historic Clothing, and The House of Worth: Fashion Sketches 1916-1918. She is a member of the American Association for State and Local History Field Services Alliance and an active member of the Costume Society of America.

Much of what we do to preserve our textile-based collection items is classified as preventative.  We aim to preserve items for the future while making it possible to still display and study them.  Learn a bit about the basic preservation techniques for textile-based items, as well as helpful, budget-friendly tips.  Also, understand how to determine when conservation is needed and when it might be safely done in-house or requires a professional.

Register for this program here.

February 7, 2018 - Interpreting Difficult History

Presented by Julie Rose, Museum Curator, Johns Hopkins University.

Julia Rose is the director/curator of Homewood Museum at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD. Previously, she was the director of the West Baton Rouge Museum, an AAM accredited regional history museum.  Her primary research interests focus on interpreting difficult histories and documenting historical enslaved plantation communities for museum interpretations.  Currently, Rose serves as the Immediate Past Chairman on the Council for the American Association for State and Local History.  She received a Ph.D. from Louisiana State University, a Master of Arts in Teaching in Museum Education from the George Washington University, and a B.A in Fine Art and Education from State University of New York at Albany. She is on the editorial board for the Journal of Museum Education. She has held positions at the Columbia Historical Society, East Tennessee Historical Society, and Magnolia Mound Plantation. Rose was also an assistant professor and an adjunct instructor teaching museum studies at Southern University of New Orleans and Louisiana State University, respectively. Her most recent publication is Interpreting Difficult History at Museums and Historic Sites (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016).

How do history workers engage audiences in learning about difficult histories? These are the tough stories. These are the recollections from history that can be upsetting, uncomfortable and at times even shocking to learn. This session will involve participants in learning about how to develop and deliver interpretations of difficult histories with strategies that are sensitive and offer ethical representations of historical Others. Historical representations of difficult histories can go beyond informing audiences by encouraging audience members to empathize deeply with the historical suffering of Others and to be encouraged to make meaningful connections to those who suffered and how their suffering is meaningful to society today.

Register for this program here.

February 21, 2018 - Found In Collections (FIC): Pathways for Resolving Undocumented Objects in Museum Collections

Presented by Danielle Benden, Driftless Pathways, LLC, a small museum consulting firm in Wisconsin. Ms. Benden obtained her B.S. in archaeology from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and a M.S. in Museum and Field Studies with an archaeology emphasis from the University of Colorado-Boulder. Before opening Driftless Pathways, she served as a museum director, and held the position of curator in the anthropology collections at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for ten years. She has directed national curation committees and is the current chair of the Society for American Archaeology’s Committee on Museums, Collections, and Curation.

Undocumented or “orphaned” collections are groups of objects with little or no associated records that remain unresolved in museums. Ownership of or title to these collections is often unclear. This webinar will address “Found in Collections,” or FIC items, and provide practical guidance for working through the step-by-step process of reconciling them. A complimentary electronic resource guide that outlines specific criteria and procedures for determining appropriate methods to resolve FIC objects is provided to all participants.

Register for this program here.

March 7, 2018 - Making the Case for Your Museum

Presented by Bob Beatty, Lyndhurst Group.

We know museums do good work and are critical to communities. But how do we carry that message to others? In this webinar, learn the importance of clearly articulating your case, how to draft key and consistent messages to articulate the need for change with different audiences, and develop techniques to better reach a desired audience.

Register for this program here.

March 21, 2018 - The Wisconsin Historical Society's McCormick Collection

Presented by Sally Jacobs, McCormick/International Harvester Archivist and by Craig Deller, Conservator, Division of Library/Archives/Collections, Wisconsin Historical Society.

(Session description coming.)

April 11, 2018 - Object Numbering

Presented by Krista Barry, Assistant Curator at the Logan Museum of Anthropology at Beloit College, where she received her BA in Anthropology. Previously, she worked as Curatorial Assistant at the Wright Museum of Art at Beloit College, and Collections Manager the Beloit Historical Society, where she currently serves as a member of their collections committee.

One of the most essential, and yet invasive, procedures performed on a museum object is applying a label. Numbering systems link an object to its record using a unique identifier, most often called a catalogue number, making those numbers fundamental for effective collections management. This session will introduce participants to the proper supplies and methods for marking a range of materials commonly found in museum collections. Participants will learn to identify safe and effective marking materials and techniques. They will also receive handouts for future reference, including a list of recommended supplies.

Register for this program here.

April 25, 2018 - Exhibiting Historical Clothing & Textiles

Presented by Carolyn Jenkinson, NEH Project Coordinator for the Frances Bristol Collection and Archive at the Logan Museum of Anthropology at Beloit College. She received a master’s degree in textile history and material culture studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she also served as the graduate collections assistant at the Helen Louise Allen Textile Collection. As weaver, dyer, and seamstress, Carolyn combines her academic interests in historical textiles with her love of fiber arts and textile conservation practices.

This session will introduce safe and economical ways to exhibit historical clothing and textiles in small museums with limited staff and resources. Participants will receive a general introduction to textile fiber properties, fabric identification, and common causes of damage in museum display environments. Participants will also learn to identify appropriate (and affordable) mounting materials and methods for the display of a wide range of flat and 3-D textile objects—from slant boards and Velcro mounts for historical flags and quilts, to creating or modifying mannequins for historical garments.

Register for this program here.

May 9, 2018 - Restoring Mount Vernon's Historic Windows

Presented by Steve Stuckey, Architectural Conservator, George Washington's Mount Vernon. Steve's education has included a mix of formal and informal experiences, including two graduate degrees; one in historic preservation from Eastern Michigan University and the other in history from the University of Missouri St. Louis. Steve has a deep interest in preserving all old and historic architectural elements, but has recently focused heavily on wood window preservation, flat plaster conservation, and material analysis. He is also heavily involved in research related to wood window performance and the historical evolution of various components associated to decoration and operation of sashes.

Window preservation has been an ongoing micro-movement within the larger industry of historic preservation. Many different approaches have been developed for treating the invaluable sashes and window frames of our country’s old and historic buildings. At George Washington’s Mount Vernon, window preservation is on the forefront of the architectural work completed on the 18th-century fabric. This webinar will discuss the various approaches used on Mount Vernon’s windows ranging from conservation techniques to full-scale restoration.

Register for this program here.

May 16, 2018 -  Caring for Ornamental iron in Historic Cemeteries

Presented by Jason Church, a Materials Conservator in the Materials Conservation Program at the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training in Natchitoches, LA. Jason divides his time between conducting in-house research, organizing various training events, and teaching hands-on conservation workshops. He earned his M.F.A. in Historic Preservation from Savannah College of Art and Design. Jason is a Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. 

This webinar will begin with a discussion on various types of ornamental iron commonly found at historic sites including; fences, railings, balconies, cemetery markers, furniture, architectural supports, etc. The differences and unique properties of cast versus wrought iron will be addressed. The speaker will spend the second half of the webinar discussing various repair, treatment and coating options that can be done in-house.  After the presentation, there will be ample time for questions and answers.

Register for this program here.

May 23, 2018 - Historic Preservation Law In Wisconsin

Presented by John Decker, a retired attorney who spent ten years on the Evansville Historic Preservation Commission. John was the principal drafter of Evansville's historic preservation ordinance, and worked closely with Wisconsin legislators on the most recent comprehensive revisions to Wisconsin’s historic preservation laws. He is also a past president of the Wisconsin Association of Historic Preservation Commissions and a past president of the State Bar of Wisconsin.

We have just completed the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act, and the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service. Reflection on those events reminds us that all effective historic preservation efforts are local. This webinar will explore the local preservation activities conducted by municipal commissions that comply with the requirements of federal and state laws, meet best practices, and further community expectations.

Register for this program here.

 Questions? Contact Rick Bernstein at (608) 264-6583 or rick.bernstein@wisconsinhistory.org

Learn More

Have Questions?

EnlargeMap of Wisconsin Field Services Regions

Wisconsin Field Services Regions

 

Contact the Northern Representative:

Janet Seymour
c/o University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire,
Hibbard 728
105 Garfield Avenue, Eau Claire, Wisconsin 54701-4004
Phone: 715-836-2250

Contact the Southern Representative:

Richard Bernstein
Wisconsin Historical Society, 816 State Street,
Room 455
Madison, WI 53706-1482
Phone: 608-264-6583

 

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