Use the smaller-sized text Use the larger-sized text Use the very large text

Wisconsin State Capitol

Wisconsin State Capitol


The Wisconsin State Capitol sits in the center of the Capitol Park, located atop a hilltop on an isthmus formed by lakes Monona and Mendota. The nine and one-half acre landscaped grounds forming the square remains at the center of the original historic plat of Madison, designed in 1836 by James Duane Doty and surveyor J.V. Suydam. The current, granite faced, Beaux-Arts style building is the third on the site, and the fourth capitol building of Wisconsin. The Wisconsin State Capitol has important associations with the Progressive Movement in the early decades of the twentieth century. Governor Phillip La Follette's contributions to social reform include model legislation for unemployment compensation and for an increased governmental role in economic planning. The capitol building was also the home of the Legislative Reference Library, an outgrowth of the "Wisconsin Idea"  -- the concept that knowledge gathered by the research efforts of university faculty should be utilized to improve the lives of the citizens of the state.

View the Document

Related Topics: Territory to Statehood
The Progressive Era
The State Constitutions of 1846 and 1848
The Career of Robert M. La Follette
Progressivism and the Wisconsin Idea
Creator: Post, George Brown, William Stone Post, and James Otis Post
Pub Data: Wisconsin National Register of Historic Places
Citation: Wisconsin State Capitol. Wisconsin National Register of Historic Places. Online facsimile at:  http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/turningpoints/search.asp?id=1417; Visited on: 4/20/2014
  • Questions about this page? Email us
  • Email this page to a friend
select text size Use the smaller-sized textUse the larger-sized textUse the very large text